Indigo Tries Flirtatious Pheromone Infused Body Mist

Happy Holiday Season, Party People! This is the tenth post in my 12 days celebration! What better way to celebrate Capitalism than posting reviews where you can purchase these fine items with my affiliate links?

7 out of 10

Pairs nicely with a classic martini. It is the drink of flirts. Shaken, not stirred, my friends.

This toy was sent to me by the kind folks at SheVibe! You can purchase this particular scent, which is listed as Pomegranate, Fig, Coconut and Plumeria for about $14 (USD) at time of posting. Or peruse their other scents, which include Passionfruit and Guava, or Vanilla, Sugar and Sweetpea.

A bottle of the Flirtatious Pheromone Infused Body Mist in on a blank white background. The bottle is mostly black with a purple strip at the top, and purple font naming the scent as "Pomagranate, Fig and Plumeria."

Image courtesy of the SheVibe product page.

As a student of psychology, specifically focusing on relationships, I have been interested in pheromones before. Science focuses on pheromones in the communication of insects and other types of creatures because they are the primary language for them. Humans, as we know, depend less on pheromones and more on spoken and written language to communicate. In fact, it was thought that our olfactory cortices could not pick up on pheromones at all because they were so small. However, if pheromones can be detected, then they most likely do play a part in dating and relationships.

There’s scientific evidence each way. Since I am primarily a scholar, I looked to the research. I found that girls who lived with step-fathers were more like to start puberty at earlier ages. This may tie into the idea that someone who is eligible as a mate being around them is providing the types pheromones which signal a close mate. As a result, their bodies are stimulating the appropriate measures to become eligible mates themselves. There’s evidence that women who live around each other are likely to sync up their menstrual cycles. And there is evidence that placing pheromones related to sexual arousal in a setting makes it more likely for those in that setting to engage in sexual behaviors. However, when those same pheromones are placed directly onto the subjects, they do not stimulate sexual behavior. There’s also evidence to to support the idea that those with uteri are most sensitive to pheromones when they are ovulating. This is believed to be a method by which they can discern the best mates.

So what does all this mean? Well, to sum up, it’s likely that humans secret pheromones and that those pheromones affect the responsive behavior of others. However, it’s easy to override pheromones, so you don’t want them directly on your skin. You want them near you (such as a clay necklace smeared with the appropriate oils). Additionally, there has been limited research on pheromones and dating. We can determine the sex of someone based on their smell (though there has been no research around this with transgender individuals). Cis women are more likely to find the smell of a cis man attractive if his face is symmetrical.

So when it comes to bottling and selling pheromones, how is it possible to have them help you catch someone’s eye?

Well the short answer is that they can’t. But the long answer is a bit more complicated than that. When humans use pheromones, we aren’t sure what our brains search for. It’s still hard to parse out all the signals that pheromones can send. And when we can, there has been evidence that we search for scents that are least like our own. This may help us diversify the genetics of offspring. So when you’re looking to attract a potential mate, you want to smell as different from them as possible. That means that in order to have the best chance, we have to find the pheromones we do excrete and then add new ones that aren’t already on that list. But in addition, we can’t excrete pheromones that signal certain things. For example, excreting pheromones that are associated with pregnancy, or sexually dormant periods are not likely to attract a mate.

In essence, this spray, and the “science” behind it doesn’t work. There are no specific pheromones listed on the bottle, so it’s impossible to tell. Even if I knew what pheromones were present on me, I wouldn’t know if this added to them or just doubled up on one I already had. The product page describes the pheromones as “gender friendly” which may mean they just use the sexual arousal pheromone. However, that pheromone is often non-effective in non-sexual contexts, and almost completely ineffective for cis women on hormonal birth control.

So I tried it a couple of ways anyway, just to see what happened. I actually like the scent, which is listed as Pomegranate, Fig, Coconut and Plumeria. Fig and pomegranate are some of my favorite scents, but it does feel like a lot is happening in this scent palate. I could have used maybe one or two less scent profiles. However, I do enjoy it enough to use it. A few people I met really did not like the scent of it. I’ll never know if it was the pheromones or the scent itself. But I’ll go ahead and bet on the scent.

I did notice that after a while, my own scent changes. It never occurred to me that I would also react to the artificial pheromones I wore, but it does attest to there being some kind of pheromone involved. My own odor changes just a little bit, and I haven’t figured out if it’s a specific type of response or not. I’m one of a few people who would notice that because my sense of smell is so strong. I also don’t notice any other reactions, such as heightened libido, so the reaction is completely physiological and not strong.

When testing, I originally placed it directly on my skin with the idea that it would permeate like traditional perfume oil. I didn’t know then that my own pheromones would negate it (as the scientific evidence shows it might). Nothing really happened, and I didn’t notice any reactions from others. After a small bit of research, I saw a study that found placing pheromones on the chest of a cis woman did not illicit reactions from her or her partner. But when it was on a necklace she wore, it did illicit a reaction (though the effect was not strong).

So I tried it on my clothes like one would normally use a body mist. I have to be honest, I did feel like more people noticed me. I felt like I was turning heads a bit more and I was a little more confident. However, I can’t say if this is true or not. It may have honestly been due to a placebo effect. It may have been because when I used this, I was often going out to an event and therefore, I put more effort into my clothes than usual. It may have all been in my head, and I only imagined people staring because I wanted to. I also have to be aware that I was growing a beard during my testing of this, so maybe I was paranoid people were staring because of that.

Overall, I don’t dislike this product. I can’t say with certainty that it doesn’t work, or that it does work. The research around pheromones is still sparse enough for me to doubt that there’s solid science. But if it helps me feel more confident even by coincidence, I’ll keep wearing it.

This toy was sent to me by the kind folks at SheVibe! You can purchase this particular scent, which is listed as Pomegranate, Fig, Coconut and Plumeria for about $14 (USD) at time of posting. Or peruse their other scents, which include Passionfruit and Guava, or Vanilla, Sugar and Sweetpea.

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